Beer Bread Worth Giving Up That Can Of Beer

beer bread main Since beer is readily available, you might want to part with a can of it.

Why?

You will make the best bread you’ve ever made to date.

Beer bread worth giving up that can of beer is that simple, it’s worth sharing the wealth of your beer stock.

Once, you realize that you can easily replenish your beer stock, your belly will thank you.

Why?

Beer bread is soft and perfect for sandwiches or just as a side to a meal.

I don’t know what it is about beer bread, but I make all kinds of it.

Sometimes I make beer bread sandwich rolls, and sometimes I make Garlic Parmesan beer bread.

Other times, I’ve made beer bread bowls.

Beer Bread is Worth Giving Up That Can Of Beer

Disclosure ~ If a purchase is made using one of the affiliate links on this website we may earn a small commission at no additional cost to you. Thank you!Beer Bread Worth Giving Up That Can Of BeerBeer is great, but beer bread is better.

What if you have a can of beer and some beer bread?

Simply put you have a feast!

Well, while that might be debatable, I will tell you this, that bread is going to undeniably bring some smiles to faces around your table.

Beer Bread is Good With

bread and rolls Are you wondering if beer bread tastes like beer?

No. TO keep it short and sweet.

However, beer, really makes a great tasting bread.

That said, I use simple beers, nothing fancy, not lagers, not ales.

Why?

Sometimes those beers are nasty in the bread unless I have time to balance them out with spices or sugar.

I prefer to use basic beers that have been around forever to create beer bread.

side view of bread Miller Genuine Draft, Coors, Coors Light, these all work well and are just the beginning of beer options.

Also, I use the WHOLE can of beer.

Beer Bread Basics & Flour

bread on the top When I use beer, I use less yeast and so will you.

IF I used self-rising flour (when I am out of bread flour) I eliminate the salt.

You should too.

I use bread flour because it offers a moister bread in consistency, but self-rising flour is fine as well, just not as ‘moist’.

However, if you have NEVER baked bread, you won’t know the difference, use what you’ve got and go from there.

Need the Recipe for Self-Rising Flour, just touch this whole sentence and you will have it!

Olive Oil & My Beer Bread

loaf of bread Do not skimp on olive oil.

Always use extra virgin, that is what I do and I have never been disappointed.

Now if you don’t have olive oil, you will need a fat source of some sort.

You can sub in butter for olive oil. Butter is 3/4 Tablespoon to every 1 Tablespoon of oil.

The butter has to be melted not hot, just melted.

Notice the conversion is not a 1:1.

Crispier on the Bottom Please for Beer Bread

breadI like a crispy bottom on all my bread.

What I do to get that crispy is adding cornmeal or brown rice flour.

Don’t put too much of either on the baking trays.

Mix-Ins For Beer Bread

top of beer bread Instead of keeping the bread plain, you can mix in other ingredients.

Cheese is great for this bread.

I’ve mixed in sunflower seeds.

Other times I’ve TOPPED the bread with sesame or poppy seeds.

Bread Tips

beer bread sliced Do know that you should bring the bread OUT Of the oven and allow it to cool for at least an hour.

The bread needs to ‘set up’.

While that may not be the right word, cutting the bread right away not only smooshed the loaf, but ruins what the texture could be.

Waiting is difficult, especially when you have freshly baked bread, but well worth the wait.

In fact, you will shortly learn why Beer Bread Worth Giving Up That Can Of Beer.

I have left you optional ingredients and steps on the directives.

Your choice really whether you want to use them or not.

Since my kids love garlic salt, I often add it to the tops of the bread, but you can eliminate it.

Again, try seeds across the top like sunflower, poppy, and sesame.

Coarsely ground salt is also delicious.

Olive oil will crisp the top up and you really need to watch that you don’t BURN the bread.

The Recipe Beer Bread Worth Giving Up That Can Of BeerHave fun and let me know how your bread turns out!

I can’t wait to see.

Beer Bread main 2

Beer Bread Worth Giving Up That Can Of Beer For

Since beer is readily available, you might want to part with a can of it. 
Why?
You will make the best bread you've ever made to date. 
Beer bread worth giving up that can of beer is that simple, it's worth sharing the wealth of your beer stock. 
Once, you realize that you can easily replenish your beer stock, your belly will thank you. 
Why?
Beer bread is soft and perfect for sandwiches or just as a side to a meal. 
I don't know what it is about beer bread, but I make all kinds of it. 
Sometimes I make beer bread sandwich rolls, and sometimes I make Garlic Parmesan beer bread
Other times, I've made beer bread bowls

Beer Bread is Worth Giving Up That Can Of Beer 

Beer is great, but beer bread is better. 
What if you have a can of beer and some beer bread? 
Simply put you have a feast! 
Well, while that might be debatable, I will tell you this, that bread is going to undeniably bring some smiles to faces around your table.

Beer Bread is Good With 

Are you wondering if beer bread tastes like beer? 
No. TO keep it short and sweet. 
However, beer, really makes a great tasting bread. 
That said, I use simple beers, nothing fancy, not lagers, not ales. 
Why? 
Sometimes those beers are nasty in the bread unless I have time to balance them out with spices or sugar. 
I prefer to use basic beers that have been around forever to create beer bread. 
Miller Genuine Draft, Coors, Coors Light, these all work well and are just the beginning of beer options. 
Also, I use the WHOLE can of beer. 
Print Pin
Course: Recipes
Cuisine: bread
Prep Time: 10minutes
Cook Time: 25minutes
Additional Time: 2hours30minutes
Total Time: 3hours5minutes
Servings: 2loaves
Calories: 125kcal
Author: dana vento

Ingredients

  • 3 Tablespoons of Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Can of Beer we used Miller Genuine Draft In A Can
  • 1/8 C of White Sugar
  • 1/8 C of Brown Sugar
  • 1/2 Tsp of Salt
  • 3 1/2 C of Bread Flour if you sub-self-rising flour don't add salt!
  • 1 3/4 Tsp Yeast rapid rise, or bread machine yeast
  • Cornmeal
  • Baking stone or large baking tray or odd shaped dishes that can be baked in
  • Kitchen Scissors
  • 1/4 Flour in reserved for work surface and fingers

Instructions

  • Order of Ingredients - Wet to Dry.
  • Put the following ingredients into the bread machine.
  • Olive oil
  • Beer (no need to flatten, pour and let settle)
  • White Sugar.
  • Brown Sugar.
  • Salt.
  • Flour.
  • Well made in the middle of the flour with the finger.
  • Yeast.
  • Set to DOUGH Mode (Generally 1.5 hours)
  • Remove once the cycle is complete to a lightly floured workspace.
  • Preheat oven to 175° F and turn off once the temperature is reached.
  • Next, divide the dough in 1/2.
  • Treat each bowl with either nonstick spray or a quick olive oil brushing ( I use olive oil)
  • Sprinkle cornmeal onto the baking surface and rising surface bakeware (unless you are using a pizza stone).
  • Work with each piece of dough, tucking it into itself a few times.
  • Make sure it is not 'gooey' anywhere and if it is, adds a little flour from workspace to loaf.
  • Place each bread loaf onto the baking tray (stone) or baking dish you have chosen to use.
  • Keeping enough distance for rising and not touching. (if you are using ONE tray and not separate baking dishes.
  • Once loaves are made, cover the tray with parchment paper or bread cloth.
  • Place the tray inside preheated (shut off) oven and allow to rise for 30 minutes to 1 hour (until the bread has doubled in size, but NO longer than an hour).
  • Pull bread out of the oven and preheat oven to 400° F
  • Once the oven temperature is ready, uncover the bread.
  • *Optional - mist each loaf with water and garlic salt or spice of preferred sort
  • Cut three slits across the top of bread (optional again but I do it each time)
  • Place in the oven without cover, and bake until tops are golden brown and bottoms are cooked.
  • Generally, 25 minutes is enough. (Ovens vary)
  • Remove from oven using pot holders (tray will be HOT)
  • Allow bread to cool for up to one hour before serving.
  • Slice and enjoy it!
  • Bread can store for up to 4 days before any sort of natural molding may appear.

Nutrition

Serving: 1g | Calories: 125kcal | Carbohydrates: 22g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Sodium: 52mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 2g